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A Personal Account of the Benefits of Optical Discs

Recently, I inadvertently launched a particularly nasty viral assault on my office desktop computer. What I quickly and painstakingly discovered, was that this virus not only cleaned out my hard drive, but also followed the data stream back to our server and wiped out the entire back-up data as well. I’m not an overtly technical person, so I never even imagined this was a possibility. I assumed that once you create a back-up file away from the primary computer, the files would be safe. To my chagrin, I couldn’t have been more wrong.

The saving grace in this case, was that our company, in its infinite wisdom, also keeps a hard copy of all back-up files from our server on optical discs. Optical discs (like DVD (especially archival grade) or Blu-ray) are the only true back-up solutions that are impervious to viral attacks, accidental or deliberate deletion, hacking, etc. If we didn’t have the foresight to use optical discs to back up our back-up, I would have completely lost nearly 8 years’ worth of painstakingly laborious content including reports, pictures, proposals, templates, email history, and so much more.

I thought, what if this happened to my home computer where I don’t have the back-up systems in place I have at work. All of my family photos and videos would be gone forever. Irreplaceable memories wiped out with a single keystroke. That is not something that you can put a price tag on, or could even be replaced for that matter. I went home and backed up my entire hard drive’s irreplaceable files, especially the pictures and videos on our new archival M-Disc media. I dodged a bullet this time, will you be so lucky?

Mitsubishi Did Not Stop Optical Disc Production

In the recordable optical media world, price is often king. There are plenty of those that still care about the disc quality and also realize that paying slightly more for a better disc will cost you less in the long run when you factor in the number of failed discs that are wasted from the cheaper brands. So when rumors started flying that one of t preeminent media manufacturers, Mitsubishi Kagaku Media (MKM), is looking to close their manufacturing plants, it makes enough sense for reporters and bloggers to take the rumor and run it as factual content.

That happened recently, where it was reported that Mitsubishi Chemical (MKM’s parent company) was indeed shuttering its doors in a Japanese newspaper, Asahi Shimbun on Monday. That story was quickly refuted by MKM to which they reported to remaining vigilant in their dedication to manufacturing their continued lines of recordable DVD and Blu-ray media.

For more details on this story, please click on the below link:
In the recordable optical media world, price is often king. There are plenty of those that still care about the disc quality and also realize that paying slightly more for a better disc will cost you less in the long run when you factor in the number of failed discs that are wasted from the cheaper brands. So when rumors started flying that one of t preeminent media manufacturers, Mitsubishi Kagaku Media (MKM), is looking to close their manufacturing plants, it makes enough sense for reporters and bloggers to take the rumor and run it as factual content.

That happened recently, where it was reported that Mitsubishi Chemical (MKM’s parent company) was indeed shuttering its doors in a Japanese newspaper, Asahi Shimbun on Monday. That story was quickly refuted by MKM to which they reported to remaining vigilant in their dedication to manufacturing their continued lines of recordable DVD and Blu-ray media.

For more details on this story, please click on the below link:
http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/News/Details.aspx?NewsId=32245

CES 2012 Makes a Comeback

For the last few years, all I have been hearing, when it comes to the CES trade show, is that it is declining and destined to go the way of Comdex. Based on my experience as an exhibitor for numerous years, I was inclined to agree. That was until this year just created a frenzy of people. According to records, an estimated 153,000 people attended the show. I can’t say whether it the show was as successful as other shows, but I can say that we were on our feet a lot and the flow of people to and around our booth was at times overwhelming.

Looks like CES is not ready to be a relic but a viable, healthy featured electronics trade show which will continue to set the mark for a durable trade show.